Roppongi Area

TokyoTowerIlluminations
View from the Roppongi Hills pedestrian bridge

Roppongi is know for its skeezy nightlife and drunken tourists, but it also has a couple of provocative museums, an interesting art night, and the best holiday illuminations in Tokyo. 

4.MoriArtMuseum
The Mori Art Museum in Roppongi Hills sponsors an eclectic mix of shows, always interesting and provocative. Check out their current exhibition here.

Hours: 10:00 – 22:00 (Last entry 21:30), Tuesdays: 10:00 – 17:00 (Last entry 16:30)

Open: Seven days a week, (closes early on Tuesdays), on the day after national holidays, during exhibition installation, and from December 29 – January 3. Open on other holidays.

Admission: Adults: ¥1500, High school & college students: ¥1000, Children (4 – Middle school): ¥500

MAP

Once a year, in April, the Mori Museum hosts an all-night artfest called Roppongi Art Night.
Once a year, in April, the Mori Museum hosts an all-night artfest call Roppongi Art Night.
The National Art Center has killer exhibits too. For the legendary artist Yayoi Kusama’s retrospective, they wrapped all the trees outside in her signature polka dots.

Hours: 10:00 – 18:00 (Last entry 17:30)

Open: Closed Tuesdays, and on the day after national holidays, during exhibition installation, and from December 29 – January 3. Open on other holidays.

Admission: Price varies by exhibition. Check here for exhibition schedule

And later in the year – from mid-November to mid-December – Roppongi Hills and Tokyo Midtown put on truly jaw-dropping holiday light shows.

IlluminationsMidtown
The incredible 5-minute music and light show at Tokyo Midtown. Here’s a 30-second video of how amazing this was.
A animated light sculpture reflects in the Mori Garden pond
A animated light sculpture reflects in the Mori Garden pond
IlluminCamellia
This red camellia tree doesn’t even need ornaments to get in the spirit.

ROPPONGI AREA MAP

Nearby destinations: Ginza, Harajuku, Japan Traditional Craft Center, Kamiya-cho, Sengaku-ji, Shibuya, Yoyogi Park, Zojo-ji Temple

Read a novel set in Tokyo

In the wake of a natural disaster, Detective Kenji Nakamura is sent to investigate a death at a local shrine, where he finds evidence that suggests the impossible. How could the head priest have been murdered by someone who was already dead?…read more

 

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